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The Central District Health Department works hard to provide the most accurate and up to date information available. If you have questions on any of the pieces presented here please contact us at (308) 385-5175. 

COVID-19 Update for the Week of July 27

Grand Island – COVID-19 numbers continue to grow in the Central District, with 54 new cases reported from July 17 – July 24. The period saw a positivity rate of 22% and no new reported deaths.

The new growth is largely among unvaccinated persons, though there has been some vaccine breakthrough, where someone who has been vaccinated against COVID-19 tests positive for the virus. The district vaccination rate currently sits at under 40%

The growth is largely due to the Delta variant which is up to 40% more transmissible than previous strains. Those in younger demographics, including those in their 20s, 30s and 40s, are more likely to be affected by this variant.

The current numbers, based on data from the Center for Disease Control, means even vaccinated people should be more cautious. Today, the CDC released a recommendation that vaccinated people should wear masks in certain situations where transmission of COVID-19 could be considered “moderate” or “high”. You can find this new guidance at www.cdc.gov/coronavirus.

The Central District Health Department is currently in the process of redesigning our COVID-19 dashboard to provide information on vaccination rates and make the information more accessible to the public, which will be completed this week.

The best way to bring numbers down and protect yourself and those around you is to get a COVID-19 vaccination. In addition to our regular clinics running Mondays – Fridays, the CDHD and JBS of Grand Island are hosting a special clinic from 8 am – Noon on Saturday. Anyone who receives their first or second vaccination shot will receive 10 pounds of beef courtesy of JBS. No appointment is required.

Those who are eligible and have not yet been vaccinated should seek vaccinations as soon as possible. Vaccinations are available at CDHD on any weekday between 8:00am and 4:00pm, and on Thursdays from 8:00am to 8:00pm. Minors under age 19 need parental or guardian consent to receive their vaccinations. The vaccine is currently approved for children 12 and over. For more information call (308) 385-5175 or visit our website, www.cdhd.ne.gov.

COVID-19 Growth Doubling Each Week in the Central District

Grand Island – Driven by the Delta variant, cases of COVID-19 have doubled for the past four weeks in the Central District.

In the past 7 days there have been a reported 52 cases. This is an alarming increase that does not take into account suspected cases that have not been confirmed, Teresa Anderson, Health Director of the CDHD, said.

“As we move toward school starting and large-scale events like the Nebraska State Fair, this increase is of concern,” Anderson said. “The fact that the numbers are doubling in such a short span of time points toward a lot of spread in our district.”

The Delta variant, which is the majority of new infections of COVID-19 in the country, is 40% more transmissible than the virus that swept through the area beginning in March of 2020. The variant has also been shown to sicken groups, such as those age 18 – 50, at rates higher than that of other strains. The best way to protect yourself and others against the variant is to get a COVID-19 vaccine.

In addition to health clinics and local pharmacies, the COVID-19 vaccine is provided at no cost to patients at the Central District Health Department from 9 am – 4:30 pm Mondays – Fridays with Thursday clinics running until 8 p.m. You must be 12-years-old or older to receive the vaccine and those 12-18-years-old must be accompanied by an adult.

“Right now, with less than 40% of our district vaccinated, the threat of numbers continuing to climb is very real,” Anderson said. “Over 140 million Americans are fully vaccinated. If you have been holding off or are hesitant, now is the time to protect yourself.”

Those who are eligible and have not yet been vaccinated should seek vaccinations as soon as possible. Vaccinations are available at CDHD on any weekday between 8:00am and 4:00pm, and on Thursdays from 8:00am to 8:00pm. Minors under age 19 need parental or guardian consent to receive their vaccinations. The vaccine is currently approved for children 12 and over. For more information call (308) 385-5175 or visit our website, www.cdhd.ne.gov.

Mosquitos, West Nile, Still a Threat Despite Dry Conditions

Even with the dry conditions Central District Health Department is urging residents to take precautions against mosquitoes and West Nile Virus (WNV).

“Mosquito Numbers are fairly low at this time due to the dry conditions” says McKenzie Hatch, Environmental Health Specialist for the CDHD.  “However, that can change quickly and caution needs to be taken outdoors when mosquitoes are present”.

The easiest and best way to avoid WNV is to prevent mosquito bites. Tips include:

-When you are outdoors, use insect repellent containing DEET.
-Many mosquitoes are most active at dusk and dawn. Be extra cautious during those times.
-Make sure you have good screens on your windows and doors to keep mosquitoes out.
-Get rid of mosquito breeding sites by emptying standing water from flower pots, buckets, barrels, pet dishes, bird baths, children’s wading pools and anywhere else water can collect.

West Nile Virus vaccine for horses. 
One of the best ways to cut down on WNV for equine owners is a vaccine that prevents the transmission of the disease from mosquitos to horses. Horse owners should consult their veterinarians regarding its use. The vaccine shots are no value if they aren't given prior to exposure to the disease. The vaccines require two doses, administered three to six weeks apart, and full protection doesn't develop until four to six weeks after the second dose. Sometimes a third does is recommended. Boosters are recommended, but recommendations vary and depend upon mosquito infestation where you live.

It can take from 7 to 12 weeks for the horse to develop maximum resistance to infection. 

The most common signs of WNV infection in horses include stumbling, un-coordination, weak limbs, partial paralysis, muscle twitching and in some cases, death.  As always, consult your veterinarian about vaccinating your equine.

For more information on West Nile Virus and how to prevent it, please contact the Central District Health Department at (308) 385-5175 or email health@cdhd.ne.gov.

NEBRASKA’S COVID-19 EMERGENCY DECLARATION ENDS, VACCINATIONS CONTINUE AT THE CDHD

(6/29/21)

Nebraska Governor Pete Ricketts announced the State of Emergency, declared on March 13, 2020 in response to the COVID-19 pandemic, will be ending at 11:59 p.m. on June 30. While this will change how the Central District Health Department will handle several issues, it will not change the ready access to COVID-19 vaccines at our facility.

“The end of the State of Emergency does not mean any change in vaccine availability,” Teresa Anderson, CHDH Health Director, said. “On the contrary, with variants on the rise in our part of the country, it is vital to get vaccinated and we will not turn anyone away.”

The Central District Health Department offers vaccines from 9 a.m. – 4:30 p.m. Mondays – Fridays with Thursday clinics running until 8 p.m. No appointment is necessary. As a result of the State of Emergency ending, the health department will start billing insurance for COVID-19 vaccinations. Those without health insurance or whose insurance does not provide coverage of the vaccine can get a vaccine at no cost.

With the July 4th holiday coming up, Anderson said vaccinations are the best way to make sure you have a great holiday weekend.

“Those who are vaccinated don’t just protect themselves, but others,” she said. “Right now there are a lot of people in the Central District who are not protected against COVID-19. Every single vaccination matters.”


COVID-19 CASE COUNT REMAINS LOW BUT PERCENTAGE OF DELTA RAPIDLY INCREASING

6/24/21

The Delta variant of COVID-19 (B.1.617.2) has been on the increase in the region that covers Nebraska, Iowa, Kansas and Missouri according to the Center for Disease Control. The highly transmissible variant jumped from 34.8% to an estimated 47.5% of all COVID cases in a two-week period between June 5 and June 19th and it’s only a matter of time before it affects the Central District.

“While total cases stayed very low this month, we are concerned with the rapid increase in the Delta variant for several reasons,” Teresa Anderson, Director of the Central District Health Department, said. “First, this variant is highly transmissible compared to past variants that we have seen, so we believe it will spread quickly. The second reason is that our vaccination rate for our district is around 33% of the total population, including all ages (40% for age 12 and older).” 

Anderson adds, “This means there are a lot of people in the Central District who are not protected against COVID-19. This particular variant is known to cause serious symptoms. We are concerned is that if viral levels become high again, there is a greater opportunity for the Delta variant to continue to mutate and change in ways that makes it become resistant to the vaccine.”

Those who are vaccinated need not worry about getting or spreading COVID-19. Those who are eligible and have not yet been vaccinated should seek vaccinations as soon as possible. Thursday June 24th is the last day for vaccine clinics this summer at the Community Field House, 9:00am to 8:00pm. Vaccinations are available at CDHD on any weekday between 8:00am and 4:00pm, and on Thursdays from 8:00am to 8:00pm. Minors under age 19 need parental or guardian consent to receive their vaccinations.

The Fourth of July holiday celebrations present an opportunity for the COVID-19 variants to spread more rapidly. “We can reduce that spread by getting more people vaccinated,” Anderson said. “Our first COVID case in the Central District occurred 457 days ago. Let’s finish strong in Central Nebraska and finally say goodbye to COVID!”

Novel Coronavirus (2019-CoV)

CDC works 24/7 saving lives, protecting people from health threats, and saving money to have a more secure nation. A US federal agency, CDC helps make the healthy choice the easy choice by putting science and prevention into action. CDC works to help people live longer, healthier and more productive lives.

CDC works 24/7 saving lives, protecting people from health threats, and saving money to have a more secure nation. A US federal agency, CDC helps make the healthy choice the easy choice by putting science and prevention into action. CDC works to help people live longer, healthier and more productive lives.

Today, CDC is issuing an Order confirming the exception for unaccompanied noncitizen children (UC) from the Order suspending the right to introduce certain persons into the United States (U.S.).

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the Texas Department of State Health Services confirmed on July 15 a case of human monkeypox in a U.S. resident who recently traveled from Nigeria to the United States.